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Outpatient Joint Replacement

REDISCOVER YOUR HAPPINESS!

n 2017, Orthopedic Associates of Dutchess County became the first orthopedic practice in the Hudson Valley to perform outpatient joint replacement surgery at an ambulatory surgery center (ASC). This procedure was performed at the Surgery Center at Orthopedic Associates (SCOA), a state-of-the-art ambulatory surgical facility located next to our Poughkeepsie office location. As opposed to the traditional procedure, which requires a minimum one night hospital stay, the outpatient joint replacement procedure uses a technique that allows patients to go home hours after surgery. Performing outpatient joint replacements at ASCs on the appropriate patient can realize a significant cost savings to you due to lower facility costs and no overnight/long hospital stays. Studies have shown that patients who recover outside of a hospital setting also tend to be happier and more comfortable.

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Meet Our

Joint Replacement Team
Mark D. Aierstok, M.D.
ORTHOPEDIC KNEE & SHOULDER SURGEON / SPORTS MEDICINE
William W. Colman, M.D.
ORTHOPEDIC KNEE & SHOULDER REPLACEMENT SURGEON / SPORTS MEDICINE
Frank Lombardo, M.D.
ORTHOPEDIC KNEE & HIP REPLACEMENT SURGEON
Stephen G. Maurer, M.D.
ORTHOPEDIC SHOULDER SURGEON / SPORTS MEDICINE
John McLaughlin, M.D.
HIP, KNEE & SHOULDER REPLACEMENT SURGEON / SPORTS MEDICINE
Kenneth K. Rauschenbach, D.O.
KNEE, HIP & SHOULDER REPLACEMENT SURGEON / SPORTS MEDICINE / GENERAL ORTHOPEDICS / TRAUMA
Michael Rutter, M.D.
TRAUMA AND ARTHROPLASTY SURGERY
Michael Schweppe, M.D.
ORTHOPEDIC KNEE & SHOULDER REPLACEMENT SURGEON / SPORTS MEDICINE
Russell Tigges, M.D.
ORTHOPEDIC KNEE & HIP REPLACEMENT SURGEON
Daniel Kelmanovich M.D.
ORTHOPEDIC FOOT & ANKLE SURGEON
Wen Shen, M.D.
ORTHOPEDIC FOOT & ANKLE SURGEON
Michelle Moyer M.D.
ORTHOPEDIC HAND & WRIST SURGEON
Sasha Ristic, M.D.
ORTHOPEDIC HAND, WRIST & ELBOW SURGEON

Webinars

KNEE AND SHOULDER JOINT REPLACEMENT: STOP JOINT PAIN AND START LIVING!

Patient Testimonials

Meet Jesse

THE FIRST OUTPATIENT SHOULDER REPLACEMENT AT THE SURGERY CENTER AT ORTHOPEDIC ASSOCIATES!

Our Client

Meet George

THE FIRST OUTPATIENT JOINT REPLACEMENT AT AN AMBULATORY SURGERY CENTER IN THE HUDSON VALLEY!

Hip Replacement

If your hip has been damaged by arthritis, a fracture, or other conditions, common activities such as walking or getting in and out of a chair may be painful and difficult. Your hip may be stiff, and it may be hard to put on your shoes and socks. You may even feel uncomfortable while resting.

If MLS Laser Therapy, medications, changes in your everyday activities, and the use of walking supports do not adequately help your symptoms, you may consider hip replacement surgery. Hip replacement surgery is a safe and effective procedure that can relieve your pain, increase motion, and help you get back to enjoying normal, everyday activities.

First performed in 1960, hip replacement surgery is one of the most successful operations in all of medicine. Since 1960, improvements in joint replacement surgical techniques and technology have greatly increased the effectiveness of total hip replacement. According to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, more than 300,000 total hip replacements are performed each year in the United States. Whether you have just begun exploring treatment options or have already decided to undergo hip replacement surgery, our board-certified, fellowship-trained, hip replacement surgeons will be there to help you every step of the way.
Total hip replacement (also known as hip arthroplasty) is a common orthopaedic procedure and, as the population ages, it is expected to become even more common. Replacing the hip joint with an implant or “prosthesis” relieves pain and improves mobility so that you are able to resume your normal, everyday activities.

The traditional surgical approach to total hip replacement uses a single, long incision to view and access the hip joint. A variation of this approach is a minimally invasive procedure in which one or two shorter incisions are used. The goal of using shorter incisions is to reduce pain and speed recovery. Unlike traditional total hip replacement, the minimally invasive technique is not suitable for all patients. Your orthopaedic surgeon will discuss different surgical options with you.
You may feel some numbness in the skin around your incision. You also may feel some stiffness, particularly with excessive bending. These differences often diminish with time, and most patients find these are minor compared with the pain and limited function they experienced prior to surgery.

Your new hip may activate metal detectors required for security in airports and some buildings. Tell the security agent about your hip replacement if the alarm is activated. You may ask your orthopaedic surgeon for a card confirming that you have an artificial hip.

Knee Replacement

If your knee is severely damaged by arthritis or injury, it may be hard for you to perform simple activities, such as walking or climbing stairs. You may even begin to feel pain while you are sitting or lying down.

If nonsurgical treatments like MLS Laser Therapy, medications and using walking supports are no longer helpful, you may want to consider total knee replacement surgery. Joint replacement surgery is a safe and effective procedure to relieve pain, correct leg deformity, and help you resume normal activities.

Knee replacement surgery was first performed in 1968. Since then, improvements in surgical materials and techniques have greatly increased its effectiveness. Total knee replacements are one of the most successful procedures in all of medicine. According to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, more than 600,000 knee replacements are performed each year in the United States. Whether you have just begun exploring treatment options or have already decided to undergo hip replacement surgery, our board-certified, fellowship-trained, knee replacement surgeons will be there to help you every step of the way.
Total knee replacement (also called knee arthroplasty) is a common orthopaedic procedure that is used to replace the damaged or worn surfaces of the knee. Replacing these surfaces with an implant or “prosthesis” will relieve pain and increase mobility, allowing you to return to your normal, everyday activities.

The traditional approach to knee replacement uses a long vertical incision in the center of the knee to view and access the joint. Minimally invasive total knee replacement is a variation of this approach. The surgeon uses a shorter incision and a different, less-invasive technique to expose the joint-with the goal of reducing postoperative pain and speeding recovery.

Unlike traditional total knee replacement, the minimally invasive technique is not suitable for all patients. Your orthopaedic surgeon will discuss the different surgical options with you.
Improvement of knee motion is a goal of total knee replacement, but restoration of full motion is uncommon. The motion of your knee replacement after surgery can be predicted by the range of motion you have in your knee before surgery. Most patients can expect to be able to almost fully straighten the replaced knee and to bend the knee sufficiently to climb stairs and get in and out of a car. Kneeling is sometimes uncomfortable, but it is not harmful.

Most people feel some numbness in the skin around your incision. You also may feel some stiffness, particularly with excessive bending activities.

Most people also feel or hear some clicking of the metal and plastic with knee bending or walking. This is a normal. These differences often diminish with time and most patients find them to be tolerable when compared with the pain and limited function they experienced prior to surgery.

Your new knee may activate metal detectors required for security in airports and some buildings. Tell the security agent about your knee replacement if the alarm is activated. You may ask your orthopaedic surgeon for a card confirming that you have an artificial knee.

 

 

Shoulder Replacement

Although shoulder joint replacement is less common than knee or hip replacement, it is just as successful in relieving joint pain.

Shoulder replacement surgery was first performed in the United States in the 1950s to treat severe shoulder fractures. Over the years, shoulder joint replacement has come to be used for many other painful conditions of the shoulder, such as different forms of arthritis.

Today, about 53,000 people in the U.S. have shoulder replacement surgery each year, according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. This compares to more than 900,000 Americans a year who have knee and hip replacement surgery.

If nonsurgical treatments like MLS Laser Therapy, medications and activity changes are no longer helpful for relieving pain, you may want to consider shoulder joint replacement surgery. Joint replacement surgery is a safe and effective procedure to relieve pain and help you resume everyday activities.

Whether you have just begun exploring treatment options or have already decided to have shoulder joint replacement surgery our skilled shoulder replacement surgeons can help!
The decision to have shoulder replacement surgery should be a cooperative one between you, your family, your family physician, and your orthopaedic surgeon.

There are several reasons why your shoulder replacement surgery may be recommended. People who benefit from surgery often have:

  • Severe shoulder pain that interferes with everyday activities, such as reaching into a cabinet, dressing, toileting, and washing.
  • Moderate to severe pain while resting. This pain may be severe enough to prevent a good night’s sleep.
  • Loss of motion and/or weakness in the shoulder.
  • Failure to substantially improve with other treatments such as anti-inflammatory medications, cortisone injections, or physical therapy.

Posted in on January, 2022